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Resource allocation examples

The examples below are designed to give you an idea of how the Hardware resource allocation rules apply as the capabilities of the Infinity Connect platform are extended in the following scenarios:

Note that in each of these cases, we describe the hardware capacity requirements in terms of HD connections.

A connection can be a call or presentation from an endpoint to a Virtual Meeting Room or Virtual Auditorium, a backplane between Conferencing Nodes, or a call into or out of the Pexip Distributed Gateway. In this context, a connection is analogous to a port.

Example 1: non-distributed VMR (standards-based endpoints)

  • There are multiple Conferencing Nodes in a single Pexip Infinity system location, but the conference is hosted on a single node.
  • We have 3 standards-based endpoints connecting directly to the node.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 4 HD connections of capacity. 3 HD connections are required by the endpoints, and 1 HD connection is reserved by the backplane.

  • A presentation is then sent from a standards-based endpoint.

Pexip Infinity will require no additional connections.

Pexip Infinity will require 3 concurrent call licenses.

Example 2: non-distributed gateway call (standards-based endpoint to Lync client)

  • There are multiple Conferencing Nodes in a single Pexip Infinity system location, but the gateway call is located on a single node.
  • We have one standards-based endpoint connecting via the node to a Lync client.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 2 HD connections of capacity, one for the inbound leg (endpoint to Pexip Infinity) and one for the outbound leg (Pexip Infinity to recipient). It also reserves 1 HD connection in case the Lync client needs to send or receive presentation, so a total of 3 HD connections will be used.

  • If a presentation is sent from the standards-based endpoint, Pexip Infinity will use the 1 reserved HD connection of capacity for the Lync client to receive presentation.
  • If a presentation is sent from the Lync client, Pexip Infinity will use the 1 reserved HD connection of capacity for the Lync client to send presentation. However, if the incoming RDP call from the Lync client lands on a different Conferencing Node to the video call, then the call will require an additional 2 HD connections for backplanes to/from that node (making 5 HD connections in total — 2 video + 2 backplane + 1 RDP presentation).

Pexip Infinity will require 2 concurrent call licenses in both cases.

Example 3: non-distributed Pexip Fusion call 1 (single standards-based endpoint to Lync meeting)

  • There are multiple Conferencing Nodes in a single Pexip Infinity system location, but the Fusion call is located on a single node.
  • We have one standards-based endpoint connecting via the node.
  • A user in a Lync meeting drags the standards-based endpoint into the Lync meeting.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 3 HD connections of capacity. The Fusion connection to the Lync/SfB AVMCU uses the equivalent of 2 HD connection resources (as we can simultaneously request a stream from the main speaker and up to 5 thumbnail streams from other participants), therefore we require an additional HD connection of capacity in comparison to a normal gateway call.

  • A presentation is then sent from the standards-based endpoint.

Pexip Infinity will require 1 additional HD connection of capacity for the Lync meeting to receive presentation, so a total of 4 HD ports will be used. The same is true if a Lync user were to send a presentation within the Lync meeting.

Pexip Infinity will require 2 concurrent call licenses in both cases.

Example 4: non-distributed Pexip Fusion call 2 (VMR to Lync meeting)

  • There are multiple Conferencing Nodes in a single Pexip Infinity system location, but the Fusion call is located on a single node.
  • We have 5 standards-based endpoints connecting directly to a VMR on the node.
  • A user in a Lync meeting drags the VMR into the Lync meeting.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 8 HD connections of capacity. 5 HD connections are used for the connected standards-based endpoints into the VMR, plus 2 HD connections for the Lync meeting (as we can simultaneously request a stream from the main speaker and up to 5 thumbnail streams from other participants). An additional HD connection is reserved for a backplane. This gives us a total of 8 HD connections of capacity.

  • A presentation is then sent from a standards-based endpoint.

Pexip Infinity will require 1 additional HD connection of capacity for the Lync meeting to receive presentation, so a total of 9 HD connections will be used. The same is true if a Lync user were to send a presentation within the Lync meeting.

Pexip Infinity will require 6 concurrent call licenses in both cases (five for the connected endpoints to the VMR, and one to connect the VMR to the Lync meeting).

Example 5: distributed VMR (standards-based endpoints)

  • There are two Conferencing Nodes in two different Pexip Infinity system locations (let’s call them LAN and DMZ).
  • One standards-based endpoint connects to the VMR in the DMZ node.
  • Two standards-based endpoints connect to the VMR in the LAN node.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will reserve 3 HD connections of capacity in the LAN node (two for the connected participants, and one for the backplane), and 2 HD connections of capacity in the DMZ node (one for the connected participant, and one for the backplane).

  • A presentation is then sent from a standards-based endpoint.

Pexip Infinity will require no additional connections.

Pexip Infinity will require 3 concurrent call licenses.

Example 6: distributed VMR (standards-based and Lync endpoints)

  • There are two Conferencing Nodes in two different Pexip Infinity system locations (let’s call them LAN and DMZ).
  • One Lync endpoint connects to the VMR in the DMZ node.
  • Two standards-based endpoints connect to the VMR in the LAN node.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 3 HD connections of capacity in the LAN node (two for the connected participants, and one for the backplane), and 2 HD connections of capacity in the DMZ node, (one for the connected participant, and one for the backplane).

  • A presentation is then sent from a standards-based endpoint.

Pexip Infinity will require 1 additional connection of capacity in the DMZ node, so the total hardware capacity in the DMZ node will be 3 HD connections. The same is true if the Lync client were to send presentation.

Pexip Infinity will require 3 concurrent call licenses.

Example 7: single distributed gateway call

  • There are two Conferencing Nodes in two different Pexip Infinity system locations (let’s call them LAN and DMZ).
  • We are looking to place a gateway call from a Lync client landing on the DMZ node, to a WebRTC based Pexip Infinity Connect client registered to the LAN node.
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Call flow:

Caller inbound leg (HD connection) > DMZ node backplane (HD connection) > LAN node backplane (HD connection) > Callee outbound leg (HD connection).

Pexip Infinity will require 4 HD connections of capacity: 2 HD connections on the DMZ node (one for the connected participant, and one for the backplane), and 2 HD connections on the LAN node (also one for the connected participant, and one for the backplane).

  • Now the WebRTC Pexip Connect client will present to the Lync client as well as using HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 1 additional HD connection for the DMZ node for the Lync client to consume presentation (a total of 3 HD connections in the DMZ node), and 1 additional HD connection for the LAN node for the Pexip Connect client to send presentation (a total of 3 HD connections in the LAN node).

If the Lync client was to send presentation rather than receive, we would still require the same 3 HD connections of capacity on the DMZ node, but as the WebRTC client does not consume a HD connection to receive content, we would only require 2 HD connections of capacity on the DMZ node.

Pexip Infinity will require 2 concurrent call licenses.

Example 8: multiple distributed gateway calls

  • There are two Conferencing Nodes in two different Pexip Infinity system locations (let’s call them LAN and DMZ).
  • We are looking to place 5 concurrent (and separate) gateway calls from Lync clients landing on the DMZ node, to WebRTC based Pexip Connect clients registered to the LAN node.
  • Each of the gateway calls will start by using HD video and audio.

Call flow:

Caller inbound leg (HD connection) > DMZ node backplane (HD connection) > LAN node backplane (HD connection) > Callee outbound leg (HD connection).

As can be seen from the example above, a distributed gateway will use 2 HD connections per node; one for the connected participant, and one for the backplane.

Therefore in this scenario, Pexip Infinity will require 10 HD connections of capacity on the LAN node and 10 HD connections of capacity on the DMZ node, so 20 connections in total.

  • Now the WebRTC Pexip Connect client in each call will present to the Lync client as well as using HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require 1 additional HD connection for the Pexip Connect client to send presentation, and 1 additional HD connection for the Lync client to consume presentation.

That’s an additional 5 connections per node, so we are now using a total of 15 HD connections per node each of the LAN and DMZ nodes.

Pexip Infinity will require 10 concurrent call licenses.

Example 9: Pexip Fusion distributed call (VMR to Lync meeting)

  • There are two Conferencing Nodes in two different Pexip Infinity system locations (let’s call them LAN and DMZ).
  • We have 2 standards-based endpoints connecting directly to a VMR on the DMZ node.
  • We have 3 standards-based endpoints connecting directly to the same VMR on the LAN node.
  • A user in a Lync meeting drags the VMR into the Lync meeting (assuming an on-prem Pexip Infinity <-> Lync/SfB integration).
  • Each endpoint uses HD video and audio.

Pexip Infinity will require a total of 3 HD connections of capacity in the DMZ node: 2 HD connections for the connected standards-based endpoints into the VMR on the DMZ node, and 1 HD connection for the backplane.

In addition, Pexip Infinity will require a total of 6 HD connections of hardware capacity in the LAN node: 3 HD connections are required for the connected standards-based endpoints into the VMR, 1 HD connection for the backplane, plus 2 HD connections for the Lync meeting (as we can simultaneously request a stream from the main speaker and up to 5 thumbnail streams from other participants).

  • A presentation is then sent from the standards-based endpoint.

Pexip Infinity will require one additional HD connection of capacity for the Lync meeting to receive presentation, so a total of 7 HD connections will be used on the LAN node. The same is true if a Lync user were to send a presentation within the Lync meeting.

Pexip Infinity will require 6 concurrent call licenses in both cases (five for the connected endpoints to the VMR, and one to connect the VMR to the Lync meeting).